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Art Space – Karabi Art
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Art Space

Art Space

ARTIST

Who is an artist?

An artist is someone involved in the process of creating, practicing, or
demonstrating art. The artist may or may not be paid for or employed
by someone to create art. It might simply be a skill or a way of
living. A master of the arts, who follows a pursuit to learn or study
a skill or practice it. The common use in everyday speech as well as
in the academia, is in the context of visual arts primarily.

Historical Evolution

Art came as a translation of the Greek word ‘techne’. The Greek culture talked
about nine muses that oversaw a unique creative field. No muse,
however was associated with the visual arts and sculpture. It was so
because the Greek sculptors and painters were quite low in the social
hierarchy and their work was regarded as manual labor.

The word ‘art’ in English comes from ‘ars’ in Latin which literally means “skill
method” or “technique” but has a strong connotation of beauty.
The word ‘artist’ was already in use in countries like Italy in
the Middle Ages that referred to someone more on the lines of a
craftsman. The word ‘artisan’ was still not formed. It was the
quality of excellence that was underlined by the use of the word
artist not the field. It was due to the fact that some of the
artisanal products were way more expensive than the works of pure art
like paintings and sculpture.

It was with the emergence and popularity of the works of Leon Battista Alberti for
the first time that a division was recognized between major and minor
arts and the emphasis was now on the intellectual skills rather than
the manual skills of an artist.

In the second half of the 16th century, the academies or art institutes
in Europe defined the gap between fine and applied arts.

Artists today

Most contemporary definitions of an artist emphasize on the creative
qualities. An artist, today is someone, anyone who is engaged in the
activity or practice of art.

In the contemporary context an artist is someone who creates in the context
and within the gamut of ‘high culture’, employing their
imagination, innovation, skill or talent to create pieces that may be
deemed of any measurable artistic value.

Art critics refer to those who create art within a recognizable gamut as artists.
For the highly skilled workers in the field of applied or decorative
arts specialized terms are developed e.g. goldsmith, or generic terms
like artisan, craftsman etc. interesting thing to note here is that
the fine artists too were given the status of mere laborers before
Renaissance.

The services or functions of a contemporary artist may be listed as under:

1. To create spaces for any human purpose.

2. To create unusual forms of usual things.

3. To inscribe or memorialize.

4. To make a tangible form for things that are intangible yet.

5. To make a tangible form to express feelings.

6. To refresh the vision of the society and to help see the world in new ways.

ART GALLERIES

History

Traditionally
huge works of art have been commissioned by religious institutions
and the royals and were only showcased in the palaces and temples or
churches. These collections of art were private though and were made
available for viewing only to a chosen elite section.

The restriction,
access regulations, and the audience varied for each of these
collections and was more or less based on the whims and fancies of
the owners. Some collections were made available for viewing through
special arrangements and networking as in the case of Palais Royal in
Paris in the 18th century, while others were open to
tourists and art tourism became a major industry as was in the case
of the Grand Tour in Italy in the 18th century.

In the mid-15th
century, museums with collections donated by the privileged started
emerging, even as the Vatican started opening its doors for public
viewing of its impressive art collection. In the 17th
century privately owned museums open to the public began to be
established in the format of a cabinet of curiosities.

Many private
collections of artistic and historic significance were nationalized
in the second half of the 18th century and were opened for
public viewing. One of such prominent examples was the Old Royal
Library collection of manuscripts and artworks was donated for the
establishment of the British Museum.

Types of Galleries

Public Galleries – those galleries that are non-profit or a part of
publicly owned museums and display a discerning collection. There is
a connotation of preservation of heritage and a national pride that
is reflected in these.

Private Galleries – the galleries that are essentially commercial
enterprises with the intent to sell the art are referred to as
private galleries. Much like public galleries these too may host
travelling or borrowed exhibits.

Museum Galleries – in museums the exhibits are displayed and showcased
in various rooms. These rooms are then referred to as galleries and
named as per the exhibits or in honor and memory of celebrated
dignitaries.

Contemporary Art Galleries – these are essentially privately owned
for-profit commercial galleries that are usually open to the public
for viewing. The profit usually comes from a portion of the selling
price of the paintings. These may host solo shows or curated events
where the curator builds a show around a theme, trend, or a group of
associated artists. The galleries are also known to showcase some
artists exclusively thus imparting them an opportunity to showcase
regularly.

Vanity Galleries – these galleries charge a fee from the artists to
showcase their work. The shows or exhibitions held in these galleries
aren’t curated and usually include a group of artists. Vanity
galleries for artists are much like the Vanity Press for authors
where the galleries showcase anyone who is ready to pay for the space
and there is no selection procedure or filtering of exhibits.

Galleries in Universities – collections of art that are developed, owned,
and maintained in the schools, colleges, or universities are
classified as University Art Museums or Galleries. These are
established primarily with the aim of creating a free space where the
artists, students, teachers, and art enthusiasts can explore and
expand their horizons without the stresses of the commercial and
professional art world.

GALLERIES OF REPUTE

BUDDING ARTISTS

MEMBERSHIP PACKAGES

Artists

Level 1

  • Presence in Local Database

  • Half yearly feature

  • Media tie up (Print Local)

  • Event invite (1 in 6 months)

  • Access to Local Event Calendar

  • Residencies & Commission of Work (Level 1)

Level 2

  • Presence in Local Database

  • Half yearly feature

  • Media tie up (Print + Radio Local)

  • Event invite (1 in 6 months)

  • Access to Local & National Event Calendar

  • Residencies & Commission of Work (Level 2)

Level 3

  • Presence in Local & National Database

  • Quarterly feature

  • Media tie up (Print + Radio Local)

  • Event invite (2 in 6 months)

  • Mention & Participation in charitable auctions

  • Access to Local & National Event Calendar

  • Residencies & Commission of Work (Level 3)

Level 4

  • Presence in Local. National & Global Database

  • Quarterly feature

  • Media tie up (National)

  • Event invite (6 in a year)

  • Mention & Participation in charitable auctions

  • Access to Local, National & Global Event Calendar

  • Residencies & Commission of Work (Level 4)

Level 5

  • Presence in Local, National & Global Database

  • 8 Features in a year

  • Media tie up (Global)

  • Event invite (all major events)

  • Mention & Participation in charitable auctions

  • Access to Local, National & Global Event Calendar

  • Residencies & Commission of Work (Level 5)

GALLERIES

Level 1

  • Access to local database

  • 2 Features in a year

  • Local Media coverage

  • Manage one event in a year

Level 2

  • Access to local database

  • 4 Features in a year

  • Local Media coverage

  • Manage one event in a year

Level 3

  • Access to national database

  • 6 Features in a year

  • National Media coverage

  • Manage two events in a year

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